Making Time for a Side Project Using a Commitment Device

My team is getting used to my style and attitude about work. One core value I believe in is making time for other work (that’s relevant to one’s career) outside of the normal velocity of a sprint to accomplish additional learning or work. If you have a chance, take a look at my presentation about PTOn which is about applying a commitment device (ie: scheduling of time for Paid Time On) to ensure that the work is accounted for and is not disruptive to a team’s work velocity.  

A really good friend of mine (David Hafley) sent me this article today which is directly in line with my presentation about PTOn (Paid Time On). Teams (and individuals) need time to work through a work problem (project of role) or a problem that could yield incredible inspiration (project of passion). The challenge that I see with software development (engineering teams in general) is that teams focus on scheduling every ounce of time imaginable. If the team has 12 months in a year and they follow a 1 month velocity, then they have 12 units. The same applies to a 2-week velocity in which the team works off a 26 unit schedule. What I’m really getting at is that software teams tend to build utilization models that account for work and vacation. Occasionally, these work models account for training or an off-site. You get my point which is teams tend to over-schedule their team members like they are a bunch of Carbon Based Units.

CBLF meaning - what does CBLF stand for?

If you read the article closely, you will see it emphasizes creating “personal time” which I personally find difficult. I have a wife, kids, hobbies, etc…I will agree that finding personal time is important, but in the same grain, I would suggest that in the 40+ hours we spend at work (some 60+), we need to “find work time” for learning. 

 

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